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Subject:Impetus for our understanding of the Eucharist
Time:07:25 pm
Does anyone know what the impetus is for Luther (and our) understanding of the nature of the Eucharist? I'm referring specifically to the Sacramental Union instead of transubstantiation.

Originally, in regards to Luther, do you think it was to cut down on certain abuses revolving around the Eucharist? An effort to not take the scriptures too far (a beautiful and frustrating thing about Lutheranism, in my opinion)? The simple matter that bread and wine are still there, at least according to our senses?

Thanks for the input.
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Current Music:Lost and Found, "The Lutherans Song"
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Subject:Happy Reformation Sunday, y'all!
Time:01:27 pm
Current Mood:happyhappy
Hope you all had fantastic Reformation Sunday services, brothers and sisters!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=102kvQ1dWoY
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Time:12:45 pm

What writings would be best to look at if I want to understand how Luther understood sola scriptura? Thanks.

Posted via LiveJournal.app.

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Time:08:26 pm
Anyone here been to Wittenberg? Other then me?
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Subject:Cross-posted at my LJ...
Time:05:55 pm
Ganked from an e-mail conversation with a friend who is new to the faith. We were chatting, and she expressed great concern that she had irrevocably messed up any chance she had of having a relationship with God. This is what I sent her:

Friend*,

Here's the aforementioned parable. It comes from the gospel of Luke, chapter fifteen, verses eleven through thirty-two. Afterwards, I've included some notes on the text.


The Parable of the Prodigal Son

11Jesus continued: "There was a man who had two sons. 12The younger one said to his father, 'Father, give me my share of the estate.' So he divided his property between them. 13"Not long after that, the younger son got together all he had, set off for a distant country and there squandered his wealth in wild living. 14After he had spent everything, there was a severe famine in that whole country, and he began to be in need. 15So he went and hired himself out to a citizen of that country, who sent him to his fields to feed pigs. 16He longed to fill his stomach with the pods that the pigs were eating, but no one gave him anything.
17"When he came to his senses, he said, 'How many of my father's hired men have food to spare, and here I am starving to death! 18I will set out and go back to my father and say to him: Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you. 19I am no longer worthy to be called your son; make me like one of your hired men.' 20So he got up and went to his father.
"But while he was still a long way off, his father saw him and was filled with compassion for him; he ran to his son, threw his arms around him and kissed him.
21"The son said to him, 'Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you. I am no longer worthy to be called your son.[a]'
22"But the father said to his servants, 'Quick! Bring the best robe and put it on him. Put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. 23Bring the fattened calf and kill it. Let's have a feast and celebrate. 24For this son of mine was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found.' So they began to celebrate.
25"Meanwhile, the older son was in the field. When he came near the house, he heard music and dancing. 26So he called one of the servants and asked him what was going on. 27'Your brother has come,' he replied, 'and your father has killed the fattened calf because he has him back safe and sound.'
28"The older brother became angry and refused to go in. So his father went out and pleaded with him. 29But he answered his father, 'Look! All these years I've been slaving for you and never disobeyed your orders. Yet you never gave me even a young goat so I could celebrate with my friends. 30But when this son of yours who has squandered your property with prostitutes comes home, you kill the fattened calf for him!'
31" 'My son,' the father said, 'you are always with me, and everything I have is yours.32But we had to celebrate and be glad, because this brother of yours was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found.' "



Most of this parable is pretty self-explanatory. The lost son represents someone who has turned against their Christian upbringing and wasted all the good things given by his father, his father represents God, and his older brother represents someone who has never strayed far from their Christian upbringing.

Note that this parable was spoken to Jews, and that the thought of feeding pigs (which were forbidden under Jewish law) would have been bad enough, not to mention being so hungry that the guy wanted to eat the pigs' food. Dude was pretty well in a shitty situation, and it was all because of his own poor decisions.

In desperation, he decides to go back to his father (i.e.- God) and beg to be a lowly servant in his household. But before he even gets anywhere near home, the father (God) sees the boy coming back to him and knows that he's sorry for what he's done, so he RUNS to greet the boy, showering love and affection on him.

Now, understand that the father in this story is a wealthy landowner; a man of great prestige and dignity. But he considers his lofty position NOTHING when compared to his joy at seeing his son again. So it is with God. As high above the Earth and all of our lowly ways God is, he comes running towards us (in the form of Jesus) and wraps us in his arms, showering us with love and affection. No matter WHAT we've done, he forgives it all and welcomes us back with great joy.

The older brother represents judgmental Christians (and I'm sad to say that there are many of them out there) who look down on sinners and don't think that God should have anything to do with them. "What? This girl turned to Wicca? And SATANISM? You've got to be kidding me! To hell with her! She's not worth God's time!" these people might say.

Well, you see the father's reaction in the parable, and of course God's reaction is the same. "Get over yourself. My daughter has come home. I am overjoyed, and now all of Heaven is going to rejoice with me!!!"

So Friend*, you don't have to be afraid that God is going to hold your past against you. God relishes in forgiveness. He takes his greatest delight in mercy and kindness. Gospel is the Greek word for "Good News", and that is the good news: All the stories people have fed you about God looking for a reason to bust your ass are lies. He loves you, and he's made a way for you to be with him forever.

__________________________________________________________________
*Name omitted.
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Time:02:37 am
What is the difference between ELCA, LCMS, and WELS? I'm going to be baptized ELCA, and I know that ELCA is considered the most liberal of the 3. I know that they ordain women but all 3 are considered Lutheran. What are the differences in your opinion? No basing on any of these please, just looking for some ideas for how they're different.
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Time:04:07 am
Hey all. I'm converting to Lutheranism (ELCA) from Judaism. :-) Just thought I'd say hi. I'm going to be baptized in the fall.
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Current Music:Metallica, "All Nightmare Long"
Current Location:My living room
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Subject:A question...
Time:01:18 pm
Current Mood:curiouscurious
Hi all. I have a question for some of you. But before that, I want to tell you what this is not... This is not an invitation to revisit the LCMS/ELCA pissing contests that have erupted here in the past. This is not me seeking to correct anyone on their doctrine or beliefs.

What this is is me seeking to understand the perspective of people who believe differently than me. So please listen to my heart rather than my words, in case my combative nature seeps through, despite my best efforts to suppress it.

This was all brought about by a posting at a friend's Facebook, regarding the recent vote by Presbyterians to continue to disallow gay clergy. He seemed genuinely shocked by this development, which leads me to my question: If you do believe that gay clergy (or indeed the embracing of the gay lifestyle) is a good thing, what is your reasoning behind that belief? And how is that belief reconciled with the clear scriptural prohibition of said lifestyle?

And let me say for the record that by my own reasoning, the gay lifestyle is no big deal to me. I once belonged to the "build your own theology" school of thought that is so popular today, and my beliefs were probably in line with more liberal schools of thought. ("Liberal" is by no means used here as an insult, as is so often the case when dealing with conservatives.) However, after a long series of events I began to read the Bible and became convinced of God's omnipotence, and from that moment forward have believed that he is more than powerful enough to preserve his word through the ages. Therefore I trust it as being completely inerrant. So while I personally might not be able to see the harm in something, I trust in him to know better than I do what is good for us, and in that faith I go by his word rather than my own understanding of what might be right or wrong.

And please do not take this as me attempting to tell you why you should believe as I do. No, I tell you all of this so that you may understand my point of view. As I said before, I come not seeking an argument, but understanding of a different perspective.

If you would be so kind, I would ask any of you who respond to limit yourself to explaining why you believe as you do, as opposed to elucidating why one side or the other needs to change. I do not want this to become contentious, and ask that we all speak kindly and gently.

Thank you all for your time!
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Subject:Enjoy!
Time:08:37 am
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=102kvQ1dWoY

Unfortunately the embedding had been disabled on this video. But it's well worth checking out.
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Subject:Sermon for the 3rd Last Sunday of the Church Year
Time:09:30 am
Rev. Charles Lehmann + 3rd Last Sunday + Matthew 24:15-28

In the Name of + Jesus. Amen.

When the legions came in the spring of 70 A.D., there was no mercy for Jerusalem. God had come to His beloved vineyard, and they had rejected Him. He came into their flesh. He lived under the same Roman occupation that they did. He subjected Himself to all the suffering that living as a first century Israelite entailed. He came to His own, but His own did not receive Him. But even though they rejected Him, He called to them tenderly. He healed their sick. He raised their dead. He fulfilled all of the Old Testament prophecies. But they still did not believe in Him. They did not believe the Word of God about Him, and so when the promised Messiah who had come to destroy their sins forever walked in their midst, most of the people of Judea called him a drunkard and a charlatan.

The people of Jerusalem trusted themselves. They said, “We are children of Abraham and have never been slaves to anyone.” They said, “You break the Sabbath, and so you cannot come from God.” These are the Pharisees who walked into the temple and cried out, “God, I thank you that I am not like other men—robbers, evildoers, adulterers. I fast twice a week and give a tenth of all I get.” They boasted of their deeds, but Jesus said they were white-washed tombs. They looked great on the outside. They had all the right clothes and you couldn't catch them breaking any of their made up rules. But their mouths were open graves, and their souls were stained with innumerable sins. They looked to their works and believed that they were righteous on account of what they'd done. They didn't think they needed Jesus. They didn't think they needed anyone to save them from their sin. They trusted themselves for life and salvation, and so when God came to give them the forgiveness they needed, they killed Him. They nailed Him to a Roman cross, hung Him between two thieves, and mocked the one who was dying to forgive them.

Today our Lord says to us, “Where the corpse is, the eagles will gather.” Our translation says vultures, but it was the eagle that was the symbol of Rome. And it was Roman soldiers who were Christ's chosen instruments, not once, but twice. It is through the hand of Roman soldiers that Jesus accomplished His death for the sins of the world, and it is by the legions of Rome that Jesus would pour out His wrath on Jerusalem.

He had warned His beloved city time and again. Even in today's text, Jesus warned His people that when they saw the legions come, when they saw the eagle approaching the holy city, they had to flee for the mountains. No one who was within the walls of Jerusalem in spring of 70 A.D. when the Roman legions arrived left the city alive. But those who believed the Lord's word of warning did. When Rome arrived, they built a siege wall around Jerusalem, and the thousands who tried to breach it were crucified. Those that stayed in the city were eventually put to the sword.

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[icon] Lutherans Around the World!
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